Look Up! Jupiter and It's Galilean Moons are Visible with Binoculars This Month


For space lovers around the world, Nasa has a message for you this month: Look up! Jupiter will be clearly visible by midnight, Monday, June 10.

Image result for jupiter with binoculars

The American space agency has said that Jupiter "is at its biggest and brightest this month", and can be observed with a pair of binoculars or telescope. Although those living in the southern hemisphere will have the best views of Jupiter, people all over the world will be able to enjoy the planet sighting.

“The solar system's largest planet is a brilliant jewel to the naked eye but looks fantastic through binoculars or a small telescope, which will allow you to spot the four largest moons,” NASA posted on its website.

Space lovers will be able to see Jupiter most clearly this coming Monday, when it reaches opposition.

“At opposition, the planet rises as the Sun sets, so it is 'opposite' the Sun in the sky,” Stardome Observatory in Auckland posted on its website.

Mark your calendars, as it will be the best time of year to see it. Deputy executive director at Britain's Royal Astronomical Society, Dr Robert Massey, shared some advice to CNN on what to look out for.

“Unlike stars, it won't twinkle, even when it's low down, it will look pretty steady, and that will make it stand out. You'll need a good clear southern horizon to see it. Those with binoculars would be able to see the shape of the planet and its four brightest moons, while a telescope would afford more detail.”
“My advice to people would be to go out and have a look because it's a beautiful sight and it's really quite a thing to realise that when you are looking at the moons with a pair of binoculars it's worth reflecting on the fact that it was that discovery that cemented our view of the solar system as having the sun at the centre.” Massey concluded.

Jupiter is the fifth planet from the Sun, the fastest-spinning planet and the biggest in the Solar System. It is also famous for its magnificent swirling atmospheric bands which will be visible with a magnification device on Monday night.

From June 14 to 19, sky gazers can see a "beautiful line-up" of the Moon, Jupiter and Saturn, which will change each night as the Moon orbits the Earth, NASA also said on its website.

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